Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge

This week’s challenge is walking paths. I loved taking pictures when I did my walks. They are something I really miss and hope to get started again soon. Here are the entries for this week’s challenge.

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Share Your World (SYW)

I have really gotten to enjoy Cee’s challenges and have participated, but not as much as I have wanted. So, I thought I would give this one a try.

Does your first or middle name have any significance (or were you named after another family member)?

My first name is based on a few things. My mother and especially my father loved classical music. I think it is my favorite kind next to Appalachian/Celtic. A pavan was a courtly dance in the 16th and 17th century. Ravel wrote a piece of music that he envisioned a Princess in those courts would dance to. It was called Pavane pour une infante defunte. It was a favorite of my father’s. There are many versions, contemporary and classical. There are a couple of vocal versions of the song “Never say goodbye” and “Elysium” are based on the melody. My mother was an anthropologist/sociologist who specialized in Hindu culture. The name is also “Breeze” in Hindu. My name is spelled Pavanne because the Anne is in homage to my mother’s cousin named Mary Anne and my middle name Marie is for my mother’s best friend Marie. It was not a name that you appreciated when you were younger, but I have grown to appreciate it and the meanings behind it.

https://video.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?fr=yhs-iba-1&hsimp=yhs-1&hspart=iba&p=Pavane+pour+une+infante+d%C3%A9funte#id=48&vid=f31bc0008ef0aa4368640b7c04eacd52&action=view

Music or silence while working?

I like to have music in the background. Quiet and soothing when I want to be really creative or studying and a bit more energetic if I am doing research for articles.

If you had a special place for your three most special possessions (not including photos, electronics, people or animals), what would they be?

My wedding ring stays on my finger at all times. I have pictures drawn by my brother’s friend that are on my wall over my desk in the den. They are done with watercolor markers and ink. I love them, they were wonderful gifts. I have two mantels from a house built in the 1700’s that my father was trying to save before he passed away. I couldn’t afford to fix it after he passed, but I saved the mantels and have them in my home. One is in my den and one is in the foyer hall. The one in my den is not pretty but is roughly hand made and most likely by a freed slave that lived in the house for quite a few years.

The Never List: What are things you know you never will do?

I don’t know what I will never do. I don’t think I will ever do patient care again as I am physically unable to do so. At least not in the way I did as a nurse or respiratory therapist. I don’t like to think of things I can’t do, but what I can do.

Optional Bonus question:  What are you grateful for from last week, and what are you looking forward to in the week coming up? 

I am grateful that I have a home to live in with a roof that doesn’t leak and heat. It needs a lot of work, but it home. I am looking forward to allowing myself to stop grieving over my past life and the things I can’t do anymore and move on to things that I can do.

bless you

I have always loved the way she writes and this touched me particularly deep today. I thought I would share.

rarasaur

I don’t remember learning how to love, originally.  I only remember the origins of little love-habits.

I remember holding onto my stuffed elephant, tucked safely in my right arm always– a light grey beast with pink-tinted ears. He must’ve been a foot tall, if he could have stood on his own, but he couldn’t.

He needed me.

His fur was worn down, paper thin, from all the hugs.

“If you sneeze too hard, you’ll knock his stuffing out,” my big brother would say, so I learned to sneeze into the crook of my left arm.

Obviously I learned to love before that memory, or, why else would the cloth been so loved that my poor little elephant literally wore its insides on its out? Why else would I remember my brother the way I do? Magical, certainly, immortal, maybe.

I dropped that elephant in the mud one day, when my…

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This is just irresponsible journalism

A good read.

See, there's this thing called biology...

So of course there is a great deal of heated debate after the election. People have been blasting Trump supporters all over facebook, alleging the Trump election has now ushered in massive hate crimes. I’ve been looking at photos of sloppily scrawled swastikas on bathroom walls for a few days now, and hyperbole that insists, “this is what you’ve unleashed!”

Those things are pretty easy to debunk, to point people to the truth, but when CNN starts trying to pour fuel on the fire of excessive hysteria, it becomes far more challenging. This particular article from CNN really ticked me off, ” FBI: Hate crimes spike…” with the strategically placed byline, “Reports of racism, bigotry post-election.” If that doesn’t get you all riled up, there is “anti-Muslim hate crimes in the United States rose 67%.”

That is exactly what I received, a hastily flung accusation that since Trump’s election, “anti-Muslim…

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First Light

My eyes opened at 3:45 this morning to get ready for work and there was no light. Just the darkness of the room. So, the first light that I came into the room was the bathroom light. I have been sad the last few days and have been having to remind myself of the blessings that are in my life. I have a husband that loves me no matter what, a home with a roof that doesn’t leak, water, electricity, and food in the kitchen.

Part of living

 

Christian, the Reason So Many People are Losing Faith—May Be You

There is a lot to think about here.

john pavlovitz

Feet-walking-street-city-effects
Thou shalt not steal.
– God

Millions of people have lost their religion but they haven’t all given it up willingly. I think we Christians have stolen it from many of them.

They’ve looked at our body of work and found it far less than convincing. For all our loud, flowery talk of a God who is Love, we’ve repeatedly proven ourselves incapable of a worthy demonstration in close proximity—and so away they walk.

In the Gospel of Matthew, Jesus dreamed out loud that the very lives of those who followed him would become brilliant beacons pointing to God; that our collective character would be the loudest testimony of God’s goodness in the world. We would incarnate Christ’s love to a hurting humanity in real-time, up close; and they in turn would seek the source of what they’d experienced—and find God there waiting.

Consider this a wake-up call, because that dream ain’t happenin’ with nearly enough regularity.

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